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Midwives Award

Awarded for: 
Self-development, training, research, improving local services
Award Amount: 
Maximum £1,500
Eligibility: 
NMC registered midwife
Next Application Round: 
3 Dec 20193 Feb 2020
Next Awards Announced: 
Apr 2019

The Iolanthe Midwives Awards enable you to undertake professional education or a project that helps to improve midwifery practice. Applications are now closed.

About the Iolanthe Midwives Awards

Each year, the Iolanthe Midwifery Trusts grants a number of financial awards to midwives. You must be able to demonstrate that the programme undertaken is relevant to midwifery and will lead to improvements in care through practice, education, research or management studies. Each application is judged on its individual merits.

  • Awarded annually
  • Available for midwives registered with the UK NMC
  • Maximum award available £1,500

Is your project eligible?

These awards are made to enable midwives to undergo self-development or training, to undertake research or to make improvements to local services.

This could include:

  • Courses to increase academic status
  • Training courses to develop specialist skills
  • Travel to conferences, either as an attendee or to share research findings
  • Developing services to pregnant women in a local hospital or in the community
  • Assistance with academic fees for PhD studies
  • Organising study days for local midwives
  • Undertaking research which will benefit midwives or women, babies and/or families

Applications are made online. Please read the Application Guidance (link above) and our Privacy Policy carefully before applying.

2019 winners

Emma Mills, working at the Aneurin Bevan University Health Board, Wales, who will put the award towards the Breech Project: improving local services and choices for women in relation to breech birth.

Jacqueline Dent, a midwife from the University of Hertfordshire, is using her funding to investigate the impact of working 12-hour shifts on the safety and quality of care in midwifery hospital settings.

Joyce Adu-Amankwah, a midwife based at St. George's Hospital, London, is using her award to study a post-qualification module on advancing client-centred care for haemoglobinopathies.

Laura Bridle, a midwife from Guys and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, is undertaking a qualitative study on the barriers and facilitators for midwives accessing language services for pregnant women who speak little or no English.

Lisa-Jayne Rose, who works at Bronglais Hospital, Aberystwyth, will be attending with colleagues an "Appropriate Skills and Appropriate Places" workshop to improve home birth services.

Claire Carter, based at Princess Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust, Harlow will use her award for the iSAFE study: Infant sleep and feeding experiences of mothers in Essex.

Sharyn Lock, a midwife from Yorkshire Storks Midwifery Collective/Airedale NHS Foundation Trust, is undertaking vaginal breech birth training including observation of births with her award. Sharyn also won the Mary Cronk Award, a special award for 2019 in memory of Mary who died in December 2018.